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  • 5 Financial Preferences of Multicultural Consumers

    Posted by on June 4, 2018

    Recent research by CUNA Mutual Group’s TruStage reveals interesting insights about the unique makeup and preferences of Hispanics and other multicultural consumer groups. Below are some of the key findings from the What Matters Now research along with what they mean for credit unions seeking to establish more meaningful relationships with multicultural consumers.

    Multicultural consumers have significant buying power.

    Over the past five years, multicultural consumer groups have accounted for 100 percent of U.S. population growth and 61 percent of credit union growth. The annual spending growth rate for Hispanics is 4.1 percent, compared to 1.4 percent for Whites.

    What it means for credit unions: Credit unions desiring to grow their memberships, assets and loan balances should place a strategic focus on their outreach efforts to Hispanics and other multicultural consumer groups.

    Hispanic appreciation for apps over-indexes other groups.

    Hispanic consumers are almost two times more likely than Whites to research financial products and services using mobile apps. Additionally, 17 percent of Hispanics reported applying for financial accounts and products through an app, compared to only 9 percent of Whites.

    What it means for credit unions: To be relevant to Hispanic and other multicultural consumers, credit unions should be investing in mobile strategies. These cooperatives should ensure their mobile apps have a Spanish language option and the experiences are culturally relevant to Hispanic consumers.

    Business loans are a desired product.

    Hispanics are nine times more likely than Whites to take out a small business loan in the next five years.

    What it means for credit unions: Invest in products and resources to help Hispanic entrepreneurs, such as small business-friendly loans, microloans and small-business financial education. Also, consider partnering with organizations that offer small business assistance, such as local Hispanic chambers of commerce and small business incubators.

    Hispanics prioritize ease of use.

    Twenty-three percent of Hispanics look for convenience in financial products and services, even if it means higher rates or fees, compared to only 9 percent of Whites. Flexible payment schedules and speed of lending are also more important to Hispanics than other groups.

    What it means for credit unions: No two consumers are exactly alike. Providing a range of product options and fee structures will help you be relevant to a wider range of consumer segments. Offering instant online loan approvals is one way to meet a need for many Hispanic consumers.

    Hispanic consumers tend to worry about finances.

    Every expense category studied by CUNA Mutual causes Hispanic consumers concern — sometimes up to 20 percent more than other consumer groups. At the same time, Hispanics tend to have a stronger sense of generosity and community than other consumer groups.

    What it means for credit unions: Think about ways to help relieve concerns for Hispanic consumers through relevant financial education and resources. Also, be sure to educate local consumers on the credit union philosophy of “people helping people,” and share stories of how your credit union and members are improving the lives of individuals and families in your community.

    As you apply these findings to your credit union’s Hispanic outreach strategies, be careful not to over-simplify the data. “When examining the research findings, it’s important to remember a person is made up of many unique cultural aspects,” said Opal Tomashevska, manager, multicultural business strategy, CUNA Mutual Group. “Be careful not to over-generalize or create stereotypes from this information and apply it to all members of a certain group. The data shows trends and significant differences but does not attempt to speak for every individual.”

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