• page_01
  • page_02
  • page_03
  • page_04
  • page_05
  • page_06
  • page_07
  • page_08
  • page_09
  • page_10
  • page_11
  • page_12
  • page_13
  • page_14
  • page_15
  • page_16
  • page_17
  • page_18
  • page_19
  • page_20
  • tags_01
  • tags_02
  • tags_03
  • tags_04
  • tags_05
  • tags_06
  • tags_07
  • tags_08
  • tags_09
  • tags_10
  • tags_11
  • tags_12
  • tags_13
  • tags_14
  • tags_15
  • tags_16
  • tags_17
  • tags_18
  • tags_19
  • tags_20
  • news_01
  • news_02
  • news_03
  • news_04
  • news_05
  • news_06
  • news_07
  • news_08
  • news_09
  • news_10
  • news_11
  • news_12
  • news_13
  • news_14
  • news_15
  • news_16
  • news_17
  • news_18
  • news_19
  • news_20
  • news_21
  • news_22
  • news_23
  • news_24
  • news_25
  • news_26
  • news_27
  • news_28
  • news_29
  • news_30
  • news_31
  • Get to Know Kenia Calderon

    Posted by on November 6, 2017

    Continuing our get-to-know series, this blog post features Kenia Calderon, client relations associate for Coopera.

    How did you end up working for Coopera?

    In 2014, I participated in the Latina Leadership Initiative, a leadership program for young Latina women in Iowa. Miriam De Dios Woodward, Coopera’s CEO, presented about the opportunities in the underbanked and unbanked Hispanic market. I could relate to her presentation, as I grew up in an underbanked household. I was intrigued by the topic and by her personal story.

    I reached out to Miriam because I was interested in learning more about Coopera and her career path. I was a sophomore in college, unsure of what I wanted to do after graduation, and meeting Miriam gave me hope of someday finding a job that would make a positive impact in the Hispanic community. She was looking for a summer intern at the time, and I applied. Fortunately, I was offered the internship, and I’m still here, now serving as a client relations associate!

    What does your typical day look like?

    I work to ensure we are exceeding our partners’ and our own expectations. Assisting our clients through their Hispanic Growth Strategy is by far my favorite part. This comes in different forms, such as helping them find local resources, sharing my personal experiences and expertise during a consulting meeting or working together to create new staff training materials.

    I am constantly learning about our clients’ needs, objectives and culture. My daily goal is to help our clients get a step closer to becoming the preferred financial service provider for their local Hispanic community.

    What’s the best business advice you’ve ever received?

    “It’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

    This is a great reminder for someone like me who likes to be challenged and embraces change. My mind is always running too fast for my body to keep up. Therefore, I need to remind myself to slow down and ensure that I have the necessary resources, health and energy to keep going on this marathon called life.

    What gets you out of bed in the morning?

    My love for life and humanity. I’ve always devoted my time and energy to causes that matter. My position at Coopera is no different because we help our partners grow their organizations and improve the lives of my Hispanic community. Fortunately, I found a job that I love and enjoy every day.

    I also can’t stay still for very long, so staying in bed all day is not an option.

    What excites you the most about the future of financial services in the Hispanic market?

    The impact credit unions have yet to make. By meeting the needs of Hispanics in their communities and becoming their preferred financial services provider, credit unions will not only help Hispanics reach economic stability, but credit unions, themselves, will experience growth in membership, product usage, market penetration, etc. The opportunity is knocking on their doors; it is up to them to embrace this community in need.

    Where do you go/what do you do to get inspiration?

    Remember how I said I couldn’t stay still? Well, I coach an eighth-grade volleyball team, direct a Hispanic youth choir, volunteer with immigrant service organizations and meet with Hispanic high school students to talk about their college plans.

    I’m active in my local Hispanic/immigrant community because it took a village for me to graduate from college. Therefore, it is my duty to give back and invest my time in the future generation of Hispanic leaders. My community inspires me to continue moving forward as we reach new opportunities together.

    What is something unique about you most people wouldn’t know?

    I have a great appreciation for art. When I was younger, I took any opportunity I had to create things with my hands from pottery to paintings. My senior year in high school, I made All-State in Iowa for my diverse art portfolio. Art is the one aspect of my life that I enjoy the most as it forces me to slow down and relax. Most of my pieces showcase my culture, life experiences and Salvadoran background.

    Leave a comment

    Serving a Consumer Powerhouse: Younger Hispanic Women

    Posted by on October 9, 2017

    A Nielsen report released last month details the growing consumer power and influence of Hispanic females living in the U.S. According to the report, Latina 2.0: Fiscally Conscious, Culturally Influential & Familia Forward, this demographic grew 37 percent between 2005 and 2015, compared to 2 percent for their non-Hispanic White counterparts and 11 percent for total women in the U.S. Younger Hispanic women are also outpacing the rest of the nation in buying power.

    Below are a few key findings in the report, along with actions credit unions should consider – especially as we close out another successful National Hispanic Heritage Month.

    Entrepreneurship
    The steep rise in the number of Hispanic women attaining higher education and entering the workforce is fueling a boom in Latina entrepreneurship. Hispanic females outpaced the total U.S. population for new business creation. Also, the total number of Hispanic female majority-owned firms grew more than three times the rate of total female majority-owned firms and more than two times the rate of Hispanic male majority-owned firms.

            Credit union actions: Consider starting a program to provide young entrepreneurs access to capital, mentorship and networking opportunities – with a special focus on Hispanic women.

    Cultural Ties
    Ties to culture and language remain important to many Hispanic women in the U.S. In fact, 74 percent over the age of five speak a language other than English at home. Although at least 81 percent of U.S. Hispanic females speak English well, 95 percent of those who are foreign-born and 59 percent of those who are U.S.-born speak at least some Spanish at home.

            Credit union actions: Ensure your products, services and marketing materials are culturally relevant and language appropriate for Hispanic members.

    Use of Mobile
    For many Hispanic women, communication is paramount, and smartphones are the tech device of choice. This demographic spends, on average, 22 hours weekly watching videos and using apps or the Internet on their smartphones. Hispanic women over-index against non-Hispanic white women by 15 percent for smartphone ownership and spend more time watching videos on their smartphone than women in general.

            Credit union actions: When planning your mobile banking and payments strategies, recognize Hispanic females as a key audience. Consider holding focus groups or other forums for getting feedback from a cross-section of members. When possible, incorporate video into your Hispanic-focused communications strategy.

    Leave a comment