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  • Hispanics Own Credit Cards, But Prefer Other Payment Methods

    Posted by on February 18, 2016

    While more than a third of U.S. consumers use credit cards most often to make purchases, just 19 percent of U.S. Hispanics do the same. That is not to say members of this growing and increasingly influential minority group do not own credit cards. In fact, nearly 60 percent have one in their wallets.

    Why, then, do Hispanic credit cardholders appear to prefer other methods of payment, such as cash and debit cards?

    It’s an issue I’ve studied for several years as part of an Affiliates Management Company work group. The group counts Corey Skadburg, a credit card expert and the director of credit and risk for Coopera sister company TMG Financial Services, among its members.

    TMG Financial Services Director of Credit & Risk Corey Skadburg

    TMG Financial Services Director of Credit & Risk Corey Skadburg

    “The majority of credit card products on the market today are not geared toward the specific needs of the Hispanic market, particularly for those individuals who may not have traditional credit or for whom fees are a major turn off,” Skadburg said. “It’s easy to see how that lack of focused attention and customization can feed an apathetic relationship. But this is a market the industry simply can’t ignore. We expect to see more credit cards issuers – both large and small – funnel increased resources toward getting it right with Hispanic cardholders in 2016.”

    As Coopera has advised work groups, steering committees and industry associations, it’s important to recognize the Hispanic market is multifaceted. We know, for instance, not all Hispanic consumers lack traditional credit. We know there are niche and subgroups who all want different things from their financial products, including credit cards. This will be an important consideration as the credit union and other card-issuing industries evolve to serve Hispanic consumers.

    Looking ahead, it’s possible we may see Hispanic consumers who own a credit card become more active as digital wallets (at least those powered by credit cards) become more popular. That’s because Hispanic consumers tend to over-index on all things mobile. Many are mobile banking users and a sizable percentage say they have used mobile payments in the last 12 months. As Apple Pay, Android Pay and Samsung Pay are accepted in more places, we may see more Hispanic credit cardholders activate, use and become increasingly loyal to their cards, albeit through a completely separate brand. Of course, credit cards are not the only payment method available to mobile payment users, so it will be interesting to see how Hispanic consumers, in particular, chose to configure their digital wallets.

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    Hispanic Businesses are ‘First and Foremost’ American Businesses

    Posted by on February 4, 2016

    americanEntrepreneurialism and a solid work ethic are strong tenets of the Hispanic culture. Given these characteristics, it’s no surprise the number of Hispanic-owned businesses in the U.S. has expanded as rapidly as it has. Since 2007, these firms have grown an astounding 57 percent to more than 4 million.

    Like most small businesspeople, Hispanic leaders need strong guidance, both financial and otherwise, to achieve and maintain success. The potential to increase business revenues is seen in the fact Hispanic-owned businesses have a tendency to generate average annual incomes well below the average in the U.S. (even below the average for minority-owned businesses).

    Credit unions, particularly those focused on the growth of their Hispanic memberships, are well-positioned to provide this guidance. That’s because many of the cooperatives that are planning – maybe even executing – strategies to attract Hispanic consumers are already on track to serve the community’s business owners.

    Hispanics account for one out of every five new entrepreneurs in the U.S. Entrepreneurs rely heavily on financial services. Yet, credit unions will do well to consider creating programs that go beyond business loans and other financial products to help business owners optimize operations and grow their firms. Consider solutions that reduce business expenses, such as payroll costs, for example. Offering the employees of Hispanic businesses payroll direct deposit to checking accounts or to prepaid reloadable cards will help the owner eliminate payroll check printing and will provide employees more access to their money. This type of a program can be mutually beneficial, as the business saves time and money while the credit union establishes potentially long-term relationships with its employees.

    Like any new product or service offering, the development of Hispanic business solutions should start with research and data analytics. This will allow the credit union’s product development team to segment the market and provide truly valuable, highly customized services. Start with your existing Hispanic members. You may be surprised to learn how many are business owners who may also be willing to help the credit union better understand their needs.

    As your research is underway, begin to build relationships with local organizations that already serve Hispanic entrepreneurs and small businesses, such as Hispanic chambers of commerce. Your credit union can work in conjunction with these organizations to provide a much-needed service, connect with the community and begin to build trust.

    Once you have a better understanding of the make-up, needs and behaviors of the local Hispanic business community, come back to your own capabilities. Evaluate your existing business and consumer service offerings to see where they fall short or how they may be adapted to the Hispanic business owner. Evolving your products, rather than expecting Hispanic members to adapt to them, is critical for success with this market.

    Javier Palomarez, president and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, says Hispanic businesses are first and foremost American businesses. “Every tax bill we pay, every job we create, every product we manufacture and every service we provide goes to benefit our nation’s economy,” he wrote. And those businesses will do so to the tune of $660 billion this year.

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