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  • Payments Offer ‘Natural Place to Start’ with Multicultural Strategy

    Posted by on September 13, 2016

    Today, one in six consumers is Hispanic. By 2030, it’s anticipated that statistic will rise to one in three. This rapid growth is one of several potentially disruptive trends creating a need for businesses of all types to shift how they think about serving multicultural consumers.

    As the buying power of the Hispanic market alone eclipses $1.2 trillion annually, marketers and other strategists are working diligently to attract this influential segment to their brands. Consider U.S. financial and insurance companies like Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase and Nationwide. In 2014, this business category spent a total of $352 million on Hispanic media. It’s clear these brands understand the value of the Hispanic market and are investing in smart segmentation strategies to make the most of its potential.

    Beyond the Hispanic market, however, we see other cultures beginning to emerge as important to U.S. business. Many kinds of businesses are adopting a total market strategy in which multicultural segments are incorporated under a comprehensive consumer plan. Examples include Coca Cola and Western Union. Each has created diverse language communications, based on a genuine understanding of the cultural nuances within their vast and diverse marketplaces. Each of these brands works hard to position its products and services as vital to the happy lives of global consumers.

    Marketers and other leaders recognize that emerging multicultural markets are best served by strategies that go far beyond merely translating communications. That’s because multicultural consumers are insightful; they are also not afraid to turn away from brands that don’t “get it.” They will easily ignore products and services they don’t believe genuinely embrace their essence.

    DSC_0279

    Talking payments alongside Todd Link of Dupaco Credit Union at the 2016 TMG Executive Summit in Nashville

    For financial institutions in particular, payments products lend themselves well to a multicultural strategy. In fact, the topic was one I had the pleasure of discussing with financial institutions at this year’s TMG Executive Summit during the Future of Payments Panel session. Here’s a look at a few trending payment options and some insight about their prevalence among the Hispanic population specifically.

    Debit Cards

    The perception that “debit cards are dead” couldn’t be further from true among Hispanics. They are a prime target market for debit products.

    From 1992 to 2012, debit cards were the first overall choice among consumers. And while that’s changed for non-Hispanics, a Nielsen’s Share of Wallet study found Hispanics do differ from the national average somewhat when it comes to actual usage of their financial instruments. Forty-four percent use debit cards most often, while another 34 percent prefer cash or check. Only 19 percent use credit cards most often, compared to 35 percent nationally. The preference for debit and prepaid cards applies whether Hispanics are banked, unbanked, native or foreign-born, millennials or Generation Xers, consumers or business owners.

    Bitcoin

    New payment options beyond debit, cash and credit are beginning to compete for walletshare. Although cheaper and faster forms of payment targeting the unbanked (some in the form of international blockchain companies and Bitcoin providers) are making some inroads, it’s doubtful this alternative currency or the technology that enables it will replace Western Union-type providers in a fatal swoop. Most Hispanic consumers who send money abroad are happy with current non-traditional finance industry providers. They’re also tech savvy. More Hispanics than non-Hispanics own a smartphone and use it to conduct financial transactions.

    PayPal & Mobile Wallets

    Just how tech savvy are Hispanics? Consider the following: According to the TD Bank Checking Experience Index, Google Wallet, Pop Money, Venmo, PayPal, SquareCash and other services are important among Latinos. Nearly half of Latino respondents surveyed by the index indicated they used PayPal within the last three months to send money to peers, citing ease of use and convenience. These consumers also made 22 percent of all mobile payments in 2014 (16 percent of the U.S. consumer base today).

    What’s more, at least 85 percent of Hispanics in the U.S. have mobile phones compared to 88 percent of non-Hispanic whites. However, 82 percent of Hispanic mobile phone users have a smartphone, compared to 68 percent of non-Hispanic whites. Hispanic mobile users with bank accounts show a higher rate of use of mobile-banking relative to mobile phone users with bank accounts overall. They make transactions, pay bills at least weekly and send money internationally with their smartphones.

    Prepaid Cards

    According to the Federal Reserve, prepaid cards are the fastest growing form of non-cash payments. They are cost-effective, flexible and easy to use for consumers, governments and businesses. A lot of innovation exists from specialized providers more so than traditional financial institutions.

    Importantly for multicultural payment strategies, federal regulators are working to ensure language barriers don’t prevent non-English speaking consumers from having a good experience. The more prepaid providers are incentivized to meet the needs of an ever-changing and multicultural market, the better prepaid cards will become as a viable alternative to debit and credit cards.

    The variety of payment options available to today’s consumers creates a terrific opportunity for both financial institutions and consumers. Credit unions, in particular, should continue developing a deeper understanding of multicultural member needs and behaviors to effectively reach new consumers. Payments, with their increasing emphasis on mobility and innovation, are a natural place to start.

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