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  • Greater Income Mobility among Hispanics Spells Opportunity for Credit Unions

    Posted by on July 16, 2018

    In our last blog post, we shared several stats that reveal how Hispanics in the U.S. are driving America’s economic growth. A recent study by Stanford, Harvard and Census Bureau researchers further confirms this point and signals additional opportunities for credit unions.

    The study shows Hispanics are escaping poverty and climbing the economic ladder at nearly the same pace as their white peers.

    THE RESEARCH

    •  Among Hispanics in the U.S. who grew up in the lowest income segment, 45 percent made it to the middle class or even higher, compared to 46 percent of whites.

    •  Of those who grew up in the lower middle class segment, 28 percent made it to the upper middle class or higher, compared to 35 percent of whites.

    •  Nearly half of Hispanic high school graduates, ages 18 to 24, were in college in 2016, up from just under a third in 1999.

    THE CREDIT UNION OPPORTUNITY

    Consider how you can help more Hispanic members become homeowners. As Hispanic income grows, so will the ability to buy homes and make other financial investments. In 2017, more than 167,000 Hispanics purchased a first home, taking the total number of Hispanic homeowners to nearly 7.5 million (46.2 percent of Hispanic households). Hispanics are the only demographic to have increased their rate of homeownership for the last three consecutive years. By offering a variety of home loan options supported by culturally relevant education, credit unions can help more Hispanics realize the dream of homeownership.

    Offer programs to help Hispanic members save for retirement. A recent survey found 71 percent of middle-income Hispanics feel they are behind on preparing for retirement, compared to 63 percent of the general population. At the same time, many have difficulty securing the financial services that can help them address these issues. The survey found 59 percent are unsure who to go to for financial advice and guidance; 53 percent say it’s difficult to find financial services companies that know how to help households like the ones they belong to; and 42 percent believe they have different financial planning needs than the average household. Fortunately, increasing income mobility will allow Hispanics to start saving for retirement sooner. Consider how your credit union can be the financial services provider many Hispanics are looking for to help with their retirement savings needs.

    Partner with high schools and colleges to offer financial education to students. While more Hispanics are attending college, their graduation rates tend to be lower than their white peers. A report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center found that 45.8 percent of Hispanic students who entered college in 2010 completed their degree within six years, compared to 62 percent of whites. This disparity could be the result of several different factors, including financial challenges. By offering culturally relevant financial education on topics like budgeting and student loans – as well as encouraging students to establish a relationship with a credit union before or during their college years – you can help more Hispanic students graduate from college and land higher paying jobs.

    While the numbers on Hispanic income mobility are encouraging, there is still work to be done. Who better to do it than credit unions?

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    Hispanics Are Driving U.S. Economic Growth. Here’s Why Credit Unions Should Care.

    Posted by on July 2, 2018

    Anyone curious about the Hispanic community’s contribution to the U.S. economy need not look any further than these stats from the first half of this decade, provided by the Latino Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Report:

    • At 2.9 percent, the U.S. Hispanic GDP experienced the third-highest growth rate in the world, behind only China and India. It was nearly 70-percent higher than the non-Hispanic U.S. GDP growth rate of 1.7 percent.

    • If it were an independent country, the U.S. Hispanic GDP would be the seventh largest in the world, larger than the GDP of India, Italy, Brazil or Canada.

    • While the non-Hispanic U.S. workforce shrank by about 4,000 workers, the Hispanic U.S. workforce grew by nearly 2.5 million, making possible an overall increase of 2.4 million in the U.S. workforce, ages 24 to 64.

    • The U.S. Hispanic college graduate population, ages 20 to 24, grew by 40.6 percent, compared to 13.6 percent for the non-Hispanic population in the same category.

    • As young Hispanics enter the workforce and older non-Hispanics leave it, the Hispanic GDP will account for an increasing portion of the total U.S. GDP growth, projected to be 24.4 percent of total U.S. GDP growth by 2020.

    What do these stats mean for credit unions?

    • As the Hispanic community’s impact on the U.S. economy continues to grow, so will its need for financial services. There’s never been a better time for credit unions to start (or grow) a Hispanic membership growth strategy. Those that don’t will find it increasingly difficult to grow their total membership, deposits and loan balances.

    • Young Hispanics will be an increasingly important pool of talent as credit unions grow and hire new employees. As college-educated Hispanics continue to enter the workforce at a faster rate than non-Hispanics, it’s important for credit unions to review their recruiting and hiring processes to ensure they are appealing to Hispanics.

    • Dispelling myths about Hispanics is a joint effort. Despite the above statistics, some segments of the U.S. population are not aware of the essential role Hispanics play in the success of the domestic economy. Consider ways you might partner with organizations and Hispanic leaders in your community to help tell the story.

    In short, the U.S. Hispanic community is growing in number, spending power, education and – for growth-minded credit unions – opportunity.

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    Through Partnerships (and Great Videos) Ascentra Credit Union Accelerates Financial Education Initiative

    Posted by on June 18, 2018

    Continuing our series of blog posts providing updates on 2017 Warren Morrow Hispanic Growth Fund grant recipients, today we’re following up with Ascentra Credit Union in Bettendorf, Iowa.

    To fully understand the reason Ascentra Credit Union is using its grant funds the way it is, it’s helpful to consider two important stats:

    •  90 percent of Hispanic consumers stream video on their mobile devices.

    •  7 in 10 Hispanics regularly use YouTube.

    With the grant funds, the credit union has translated 16 video scripts into Spanish for a series of financial education videos. Not only are these videos available on Ascentra’s YouTube channel, they have also been airing on its local NBC affiliate, KWQC-TV, serving the Quad Cities area of southeastern Iowa and northwestern Illinois. The videos are available on the television station’s website, as well.

    In addition, the grant funds enabled Ascentra to add Spanish subtitles to their existing financial education videos.

    “The Warren Morrow Hispanic Growth Fund Grant has been instrumental in providing lasting and ongoing content in Spanish for Ascentra’s Financial Wellness program,” said Alvaro Macias, Ascentra AVP of community development. “We are now in the process of working with our local Spanish/English newspaper Hola America News to use their social media channels to share these informative one-minute videos to effectively reach local Spanish-speakers.”

    Ascentra is also offering a series of financial education presentations in partnership with Esperanza Legal Assistance Center, a low-cost immigration service provider. The grant provided the funds needed to translate three presentations into Spanish. Spanish-language flyers were distributed throughout the predominantly Hispanic neighborhood in which the center is located, and the content was also used to promote the seminar on Facebook.

    “We have plans to further utilize the translation services; we have some brochures that need to be translated and are planning to re-launch our website later this year,” Marcias said. “Our goal is to have the entire website available in Spanish.”

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    5 Financial Preferences of Multicultural Consumers

    Posted by on June 4, 2018

    Recent research by CUNA Mutual Group’s TruStage reveals interesting insights about the unique makeup and preferences of Hispanics and other multicultural consumer groups. Below are some of the key findings from the What Matters Now research along with what they mean for credit unions seeking to establish more meaningful relationships with multicultural consumers.

    Multicultural consumers have significant buying power.

    Over the past five years, multicultural consumer groups have accounted for 100 percent of U.S. population growth and 61 percent of credit union growth. The annual spending growth rate for Hispanics is 4.1 percent, compared to 1.4 percent for Whites.

    What it means for credit unions: Credit unions desiring to grow their memberships, assets and loan balances should place a strategic focus on their outreach efforts to Hispanics and other multicultural consumer groups.

    Hispanic appreciation for apps over-indexes other groups.

    Hispanic consumers are almost two times more likely than Whites to research financial products and services using mobile apps. Additionally, 17 percent of Hispanics reported applying for financial accounts and products through an app, compared to only 9 percent of Whites.

    What it means for credit unions: To be relevant to Hispanic and other multicultural consumers, credit unions should be investing in mobile strategies. These cooperatives should ensure their mobile apps have a Spanish language option and the experiences are culturally relevant to Hispanic consumers.

    Business loans are a desired product.

    Hispanics are nine times more likely than Whites to take out a small business loan in the next five years.

    What it means for credit unions: Invest in products and resources to help Hispanic entrepreneurs, such as small business-friendly loans, microloans and small-business financial education. Also, consider partnering with organizations that offer small business assistance, such as local Hispanic chambers of commerce and small business incubators.

    Hispanics prioritize ease of use.

    Twenty-three percent of Hispanics look for convenience in financial products and services, even if it means higher rates or fees, compared to only 9 percent of Whites. Flexible payment schedules and speed of lending are also more important to Hispanics than other groups.

    What it means for credit unions: No two consumers are exactly alike. Providing a range of product options and fee structures will help you be relevant to a wider range of consumer segments. Offering instant online loan approvals is one way to meet a need for many Hispanic consumers.

    Hispanic consumers tend to worry about finances.

    Every expense category studied by CUNA Mutual causes Hispanic consumers concern — sometimes up to 20 percent more than other consumer groups. At the same time, Hispanics tend to have a stronger sense of generosity and community than other consumer groups.

    What it means for credit unions: Think about ways to help relieve concerns for Hispanic consumers through relevant financial education and resources. Also, be sure to educate local consumers on the credit union philosophy of “people helping people,” and share stories of how your credit union and members are improving the lives of individuals and families in your community.

    As you apply these findings to your credit union’s Hispanic outreach strategies, be careful not to over-simplify the data. “When examining the research findings, it’s important to remember a person is made up of many unique cultural aspects,” said Opal Tomashevska, manager, multicultural business strategy, CUNA Mutual Group. “Be careful not to over-generalize or create stereotypes from this information and apply it to all members of a certain group. The data shows trends and significant differences but does not attempt to speak for every individual.”

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    Hispanic Women Have a Strong Desire to Save for Retirement

    Posted by on May 23, 2018

    A recent study on the significance of gender for Hispanic savings and retirement found two important things:

    1. Hispanic women have a huge appetite for financial education and a strong desire to save

    2. Their savings could provide a critical safety net to America’s largest minority group.

    “This study demonstrates that if financial information is communicated simply and respectfully, and in culturally and linguistically competent ways, Latinas, especially, will listen,” said Karen Richman, Ph.D., the principal investigator of the study, a collaboration between the National Endowment for Financial Education and the University of Notre Dame.

    Reasons for Low Retirement Savings

    Despite a desire to save, low earnings mean Hispanic women have much lower retirement account balances than any comparable demographic, the study found. Employment paths have a lot to do with these outcomes. According to the study, Hispanics switch jobs more frequently than other demographics. What’s more, they tend to accept positions that do not provide retirement savings benefits.

    The research went on to show that Hispanics with employer-sponsored retirement plans are 50 percent more likely than whites to make hardship withdrawals. Hispanic women are more likely than Hispanic men to liquidate pensions with a lump-sum payment or to spend rather than reinvest their savings when they change jobs. Additionally, Hispanic women tend to see retirement accounts as a source of liquidity. They may take loans and early withdrawals, often to help others, and they end up paying large penalties.

    How Credit Unions Can Help

    Below are a few key takeaways from the study and what they mean for credit unions.

    Hispanics have the highest labor participation, and yet the lowest retirement security. Hispanic women would benefit from workplace financial education, particularly during job transitions as they are deciding what to do with retirement accounts. Credit unions can provide financial education, as well as investment and savings products in a way that’s relevant to this influential and growing audience.

    Hispanic women tend to be the administrators of family finances. The female head of the family often makes tough decisions without knowing all the options. Credit unions can address Hispanic women’s appetite for financial education and desire to save through direct outreach, relationship building and financial education opportunities. A great way to gain a better perspective on what Hispanic women need is through the creation of a Latina advisory group.

    Hispanic men and women are equally likely to participate in collective financial practices based on “confianza,” or “mutual trust.” Credit unions should work to develop relationships with Hispanics based on trust. They should position themselves as a dependable resource for the community through product accessibility, bilingual staff and community investment.

    As this study reveals, a gap exists for Hispanic women in terms of saving for retirement. Credit unions, with their financial expertise and their people helping people philosophy, are well positioned to address this gap.

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    Members Credit Union Grows Hispanic Membership with Financial Education

    Posted by on May 7, 2018

    Continuing our series of blog posts providing updates on 2017 Warren Morrow Hispanic Growth Fund Grant recipients, today we’re following up with Members Credit Union in Cos Cob, Connecticut.

    With the grant funds it was awarded, Members Credit Union was able to purchase Spanish seminar-in-a-box kits from CUNA, as well as materials for financial education sessions with Hispanic youth. Partnering with local organizations to conduct seminars has been a successful strategy for the Connecticut credit union.

    More than 80 consumers participated in three seminars Members Credit Union conducted in late 2017:

    In October, the credit union partnered with Family Centers to host a Spanish financial education seminar for parents who live in low-income housing. The following month, Members Credit Union conducted a Spanish financial education seminar for participants of People Empowering People. In December, the credit union hosted a seminar for Family Centers staff, many of whom are Hispanic. The focus of that event was on both personal finances and services available to their Family Centers clients.

    “Each one of the completed seminars brought new members to the credit union, and referrals from our ‘first generation’ of new members are spreading and also yielding new members,” said Kathy Chartier, Members Credit Union president/CEO.

    One of the participants in the November seminar owns Latin Colors magazine. During the seminar, he gave a testimonial about how he has benefited from his relationship with Members Credit Union. He is also giving the credit union the opportunity to share financial education in Spanish in every issue of Latin Colors throughout 2018 in addition to partnering on future seminars.

    Members Credit Union also has plans to continue offering seminars in 2018, including:

    •  Sessions with elementary and middle school students involved in the Family First program
    •  Financial education seminars in Spanish, in cooperation with Latin Colors magazine
    •  Auto buying seminars in Spanish with Building One Community
    •  A full evening financial education class in partnership with People Empowering People

    The credit union is already seeing results from its financial education efforts in terms of Hispanic membership and loan growth. In 2017, the credit union brought in 73 new Hispanic members (39 percent of all new members), compared to 23 (12 percent of new members) in 2016.

    “The seminars, and the word-of-mouth referrals they have created, are probably our greatest source of new members and loans in 2017,” Chartier said.

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    Is Your Credit Union Friendly to Hispanic Entrepreneurs?

    Posted by on April 23, 2018

    hispanic entreprenuersIf the answer to that question is no (or you don’t know), consider this: Hispanics are creating businesses at 15 times the national rate.

    In an article ranking the best cities for Hispanic entrepreneurs, WalletHub asked a panel of minority-business experts about the biggest challenges faced by Hispanic entrepreneurs. Nearly everyone mentioned access to capital and financial education.

    “There is a clear issue with lack of access to capital to start and grow their venture,” said Pedro F. Moura, an MBA candidate at the Haas School of Business at University of California. “This is also influenced by cultural aspects in which Latinos would rather rely on family and friends for funding than outside investors. Plus, limited financial education also plays a crucial role in understanding the funding that could be unlocked by entrepreneurs.”

    What does this mean for credit unions?

    This means Hispanic communities represent a huge opportunity for credit unions to grow their lending business – and become those communities’ preferred financial provider. If there is a known preference for borrowing from family and friends, the question for credit unions becomes, How can we build and nurture a similar relationship with Hispanic members?

    Below are a few strategies to consider.

    Offer small business-friendly loans. Small-dollar loans or Small Business Administration (SBA) loans up to $5,000 can be a great way to help entrepreneurs get their ideas off the ground. With an SBA 504 loan, for example, a borrower may only need 10 percent of equity, rather than the 20 percent required with a more traditional loan. Also, the loan is normally divided into two parts. One, which tends to be 50 percent of the loan, is held by a lender. The rest is held by nonprofit groups, such as the Certified Development Corporation, with this portion backed by the SBA.

    Provide microloans. Microloans are typically very small (under $500) short-term loans with a low interest rate, extended to self-employed individuals, new startups with very low capital requirements or small businesses with only a few employees. Microloans can be a good source of funding for a business to hire its first employee, cover startup costs or purchase initial inventory.

    Offer Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) loans. ITIN loans are designed to help people who have a tax ID number but are not eligible for a Social Security number. Credit unions see the possibilities in serving a population that is not being served well by traditional financial institutions and they understand the value of inclusivity.

    Provide lines of credit and credit-building loans. During the early stages of developing their companies, entrepreneurs may not have diversified enough to generate a constant positive cash flow. Lines of credit accommodate the seasonal credit demands of businesses along with ups and downs in cash flow. They also enable entrepreneurs to purchase inventory in anticipation of future sales. Credit-building loans, on the other hand, can help entrepreneurs build their credit as they work to grow their business.

    Offer small-business financial education. Even the most robust small-business lending program can be ineffective without the right education plan in place to help entrepreneurs understand their options and select the right loans for their businesses. Ensure your marketing and education materials are available in Spanish and are culturally relevant to Hispanic populations.

    Build community partnerships. One of the best ways to expand your credit union’s Hispanic entrepreneur outreach efforts is to partner with organizations that offer small business assistance for Spanish-speaking entrepreneurs. Examples include local Hispanic chambers of commerce and small business incubators.

    Credit unions desiring to be Hispanic entrepreneur-friendly should work to build the right mix of lending products supported by a strong financial education program. Those that get it right will not only provide a much-needed service to Hispanics in their communities, they will also benefit themselves through lending and membership growth.

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    Get to Know Víctor Miguel Corro

    Posted by on April 16, 2018

    Continuing our get-to-know series, we’d like to introduce you to Víctor Miguel Corro, who joined the Coopera team earlier this year as client relations director.

    How did you end up working for a company focused on helping credit unions serve the Hispanic market?

    Victor after a long hike at Macchu Picchu in Peru

    I’m no stranger to the credit union world, and in a career-transition moment, things aligned to give me this great opportunity. It is a great fit personally, as I am a first-generation immigrant. I came from Panama and now live in Wisconsin. I remember coming to the U.S. and facing everyday struggles. Everything from trying to get a haircut to adjusting to the climate was difficult. I’d never experienced a day below 75 degrees in my life and now I was living in Wisconsin. Talk about building character!

    What gets you out of bed in the morning?

    Knowing I support my family though a career in a mission-driven industry that ultimately seeks to improve lives. When I wake up, I see that as one more day, one more chance to help somebody.

    What does your typical day look like?

    My day consists of helping Coopera’s clients reach more people who do not know the joy of being part of a credit union. I get to interact with clients and work with our wonderful team to help those clients be the financial entity of choice for the Hispanic community.

    What’s the best business advice you’ve ever received?

    Victor at a Florida credit union alongside a delegation from Brazil

    Be the proverbial bridge. That means working to connect people in spite of their background and differences. There is always common ground to be found, and that will push us all forward together.

    What excites you the most about the future of financial services in the Hispanic market?

    There is a growing understanding among credit unions that reaching an untapped market makes sense philosophically, and it also presents a strong business case. In my recent conversations with industry leaders, I have sensed the enthusiasm and a natural inclination to want to reach out and serve. The integration of technology is also a very exciting prospect for this market.

    Where do you go/what do you do to get inspiration?

    A hammock in Panama does the trick every time! But when that’s not available, it’s a long bike ride or an old song.

    What is something unique about you most people wouldn’t know?

    Victor with Oscar Arias, then president of Costa Rica

    My parents started a credit union back in my hometown in Panama. I was once a fifth-grade homeroom teacher. I have visited 89 countries (and not just the airport!). I have met six sitting heads of state in as many countries.

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    Santa Cruz Community Credit Union Sets Aggressive Goals to Help Hispanic Entrepreneurs

    Posted by on April 3, 2018

    (more…)

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    An Unscoreable Consumer Could Become Your Next Great Member

    Posted by on March 6, 2018

    Somewhere between 50 and 80 million U.S. consumers have little or no credit history. That’s somewhere in the range of 15 to 25 percent of the U.S. population. What this means is that a massive number of people in America are “unscoreable” by most traditional models.

    At the same time, acquiring new members is becoming increasingly difficult for credit unions. Competition and financial consumer expectations have never been more complex and fast-moving.

    What if there was a way for credit unions to avoid turning away “unscoreable” consumers for loans and other services? What if there was a way to welcome them without increasing a cooperative’s risk profile?

    No Credit Does Not Mean Bad Credit

    Just because a consumer is unscoreable by most traditional credit scoring models doesn’t mean he or she won’t be able to pay back a loan. Several alternative models available today can help a lender evaluate a consumer’s ability to repay. Below are some examples, along with the types of data they incorporate into their models:

    eCredable – Bills, such as rent, utilities, mobile phone, cable/satellite TV and insurance

    Cignifi – Mobile phone behavior data

    First Access – Prepaid mobile-phone payment histories

    TrustingSocial – Social, web and mobile data

    Kabbage – e-commerce histories from sites like Amazon

    Experian’s Emerging Credit Score – Internet and direct-marketing purchases, property and asset records and telecommunications and utility data

    TransUnion CreditVision Link – Property tax records and checking/debit account records

    LexisNexis RiskView – Residential stability, asset ownership, derogatory status, life-stage analysis

    One thing all these companies have in common: They’re using big data to create better outcomes for consumers and meaningful value for lenders. And credit unions have the opportunity to do so, as well.

    Alternative sources of consumer data, such as utility records, cell phone payments, medical payments, insurance payments, remittance receipts, direct deposit histories and more, can be used to build better risk models. Armed with this information – and with the proper programs in place to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and privacy laws – credit unions can continue making responsible lending decisions while better serving the underserved.

    How One Organization Successfully Uses Alternative Credit Scoring

    Kinecta Federal Credit Union uses an alternative data score from LexisNexis known as Riskview to assess creditworthiness for traditionally unscoreable borrowers. The model factors in data from sources like utility bills, public records, address and employment stability, among many others alternative data elements. The result is a Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) regulated score.

    By using nontraditional credit verification methods, Kinecta is able to approve more than 60 percent of the applications it receives. Since 2014, Kinecta has made about 20,000 loans for more than $30 million.”

    How Alternative Credit Scoring Fits the Credit Union Philosophy

    Credit unions exist to help people, not make a profit. Their goal is to serve all members well, including those of modest means – the very people most likely to be unscoreable by traditional credit scoring models. Many of these consumers fall into one or more of the following segments:

    • Unbanked/underbanked
    • First-generation immigrants
    • Millennials
    • Rural consumers

    Alternative credit scoring provides credit access to consumers who may otherwise be turned down for a loan or forced to turn to a predatory lender. Using payment history and other data sources to evaluate a consumer’s creditworthiness is an excellent example of “people helping people” – one that benefits both consumers and credit unions alike.

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