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  • Santa Cruz Community Credit Union Sets Aggressive Goals to Help Hispanic Entrepreneurs

    Posted by on April 3, 2018

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    Hispanic Businesses are ‘First and Foremost’ American Businesses

    Posted by on February 4, 2016

    americanEntrepreneurialism and a solid work ethic are strong tenets of the Hispanic culture. Given these characteristics, it’s no surprise the number of Hispanic-owned businesses in the U.S. has expanded as rapidly as it has. Since 2007, these firms have grown an astounding 57 percent to more than 4 million.

    Like most small businesspeople, Hispanic leaders need strong guidance, both financial and otherwise, to achieve and maintain success. The potential to increase business revenues is seen in the fact Hispanic-owned businesses have a tendency to generate average annual incomes well below the average in the U.S. (even below the average for minority-owned businesses).

    Credit unions, particularly those focused on the growth of their Hispanic memberships, are well-positioned to provide this guidance. That’s because many of the cooperatives that are planning – maybe even executing – strategies to attract Hispanic consumers are already on track to serve the community’s business owners.

    Hispanics account for one out of every five new entrepreneurs in the U.S. Entrepreneurs rely heavily on financial services. Yet, credit unions will do well to consider creating programs that go beyond business loans and other financial products to help business owners optimize operations and grow their firms. Consider solutions that reduce business expenses, such as payroll costs, for example. Offering the employees of Hispanic businesses payroll direct deposit to checking accounts or to prepaid reloadable cards will help the owner eliminate payroll check printing and will provide employees more access to their money. This type of a program can be mutually beneficial, as the business saves time and money while the credit union establishes potentially long-term relationships with its employees.

    Like any new product or service offering, the development of Hispanic business solutions should start with research and data analytics. This will allow the credit union’s product development team to segment the market and provide truly valuable, highly customized services. Start with your existing Hispanic members. You may be surprised to learn how many are business owners who may also be willing to help the credit union better understand their needs.

    As your research is underway, begin to build relationships with local organizations that already serve Hispanic entrepreneurs and small businesses, such as Hispanic chambers of commerce. Your credit union can work in conjunction with these organizations to provide a much-needed service, connect with the community and begin to build trust.

    Once you have a better understanding of the make-up, needs and behaviors of the local Hispanic business community, come back to your own capabilities. Evaluate your existing business and consumer service offerings to see where they fall short or how they may be adapted to the Hispanic business owner. Evolving your products, rather than expecting Hispanic members to adapt to them, is critical for success with this market.

    Javier Palomarez, president and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, says Hispanic businesses are first and foremost American businesses. “Every tax bill we pay, every job we create, every product we manufacture and every service we provide goes to benefit our nation’s economy,” he wrote. And those businesses will do so to the tune of $660 billion this year.

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