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  • Want to Keep Loyal Hispanic Members? It’s All About the App

    Posted by on July 5, 2017

    Hispanic consumers are significantly more likely to be mobile banking users – and significantly more likely to stay members because of it.

    pexels-photo-261628Walk down any street in your community, and it isn’t hard to find evidence that Americans are using their smartphones to manage more aspects of their lives. Their financial lives are certainly no exception, and community banking leaders are taking notice.

    According to a 2016 survey of financial institution leaders, their number one priority for 2017 was enhancing the digital and mobile experience. That’s what consumers are looking for as well. An earlier study from Bain & Company showed consumers are one-third more likely to enjoy a mobile transaction than a branch visit. What’s more, those surveyed anticipated a branch visit was 2.3 times more likely to end with annoyance.

    Mobile banking is clearly the way consumers are headed when it comes to meeting their financial needs. Yet the adoption of mobile financial services isn’t the same across all the demographic groups that make up your member base. Notably, Hispanic consumers are significantly more likely than other groups to use mobile banking technology.

    The Federal Reserve found in a 2015 study 82 percent of Hispanic consumers own a smartphone (compared to 74 percent of non-Hispanic white consumers). In addition, the study revealed Hispanic consumers with smartphones are more likely to be “high-intensity” mobile banking users – consumers who conduct mobile banking tasks more than 10 times a month.

    According to the Federal Reserve’s report, “High-intensity users include greater shares of younger and Hispanic mobile banking users, relative to all mobile banking users.” These users are transferring money between their own accounts, making bill payments through an app, receiving alerts about their accounts, locating ATMs – all the things that highly-engaged and connected credit union members do. That could easily translate to high levels of loyalty to their cooperative.

    If credit unions aren’t ready to appear in app stores now, there are plenty of other players on the financial services sector that are already there. Uulala, a fintech mobile app developed by Hispanic entrepreneurs specifically to serve unbanked Hispanic adults in the United States, is positioning itself as a way for Hispanic consumers to send money, build credit and make purchases – all without a traditional banking relationship. Uulala is launching later this year, and joins an increasingly crowded field of fintech developers looking to connect with a growing market hungry for digital banking options.

    When it comes to maintaining strong connections with your members, you know you can’t ignore their increasingly digital preferences. By creating and enhancing an app that connects with Hispanic consumers, you may find your credit union enjoying longer relationships with this increasingly influential segment.

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    One Credit Union’s Strategic, Collaborative Approach to Hispanic Member Growth

    Posted by on March 13, 2017

    Sometimes the best way to lead a successful strategy is to have survived an unsuccessful one. That is precisely the spirit with which Anne Hagen is approaching her credit union’s second go at Hispanic membership growth. The vice president of marketing for Iowa’s Community 1st Credit Union, Hagen believes one of the biggest lessons learned from the cooperative’s first attempt was that a single champion of the program is not enough.

    “We identified how important it would be to serve the Hispanic community back in 2007,” said Hagen. “When we lost the key person leading that effort, however, the program fizzled out. After continuing to evaluate the segment and truly understanding how underserved it is, we knew we had to try again.”

    President and CEO Greg Hanshaw explained that the calling to do more is rooted in the credit union’s 80-year history. “Our goal as an organization has always been to personify the credit union philosophy of people helping people. Although that can sound cliché, it’s the real deal around here. And it’s a huge part of why we felt years ago it was critically important to reach the Hispanic market.”

    CU Recognizes Need for Grassroots Leadership

    logo_2cThe credit union recognized a Hispanic member growth plan would need to be a cooperative-wide initiative supported by everyone from frontline staff to the C-suite. Yet, they also understood the importance of hiring an empathetic community member. This individual would help credit union staff better identify and overcome obstacles to engaging the Hispanic community. David Suarez joined the credit union as Bilingual Community Development Manager in June 2015. Suarez then helped recruit Edith Cabrera, the credit union’s first Hispanic board member.

    “When David came to the credit union, he did not sit back,” said Hagen. “He immediately identified those areas where we weren’t doing enough for the community and started building initiatives from scratch. He spearheaded partnership with Coopera to help us learn best practices and with local Hispanic organizations to get us connected to the community in a grassroots way.”

    According to Hagen, Suarez has a knack for explaining to community members how a credit union can help. “His message really resonates with the Hispanic people in the communities we serve.” The result has been close relationships with many credit union members, many of whom attribute their financial successes to his guidance.

    That knack for explaining extends to Suarez’s influence inside the credit union. “One thing I’ve learned from David is a lot of the folks in Iowa have come from cultures and backgrounds where they didn’t trust the financial system that was built to provide those types of services,” said Hanshaw. “So we have an opportunity to show what a not-for-profit cooperative is and how it is uniquely built to provide services to people who may not meet the right criteria at a traditional financial institution.”

    To read more about Community 1st all-in approach to Hispanic membership growth, download “Hispanic Member Growth Not Just for ‘Gateway States’ Anymore.”

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    Focus Groups Help Idaho Credit Union Identify Hyperlocal Issues

    Posted by on July 28, 2015

    Side view of three mid adult people sitting and talking

    Side view of three mid adult people sitting and talking

    An intentional, strategic focus on the Hispanic member experience has become a top priority for Idaho Central Credit Union (ICCU). The cooperative’s home state saw the Hispanic population increase by 17 percent from 2000 to 2010, and several of its 26 branches are located areas rich in Hispanic culture.

    michaelwatson (2)Although the credit union has long worked to translate materials and hire bilingual personnel, there has not been a formal plan in place for actively engaging the Hispanic community and the credit union’s existing Hispanic members. Before developing that plan, however, Marketing Manager Michael Watson wanted to ensure the credit union did its homework.

    “There’s a lot of national research out there specific to the Hispanic consumer to which we could have turned,” said Watson. “Yet, we wanted results specific to our local markets. What may be true for most Hispanics may not be true for the Hispanics in eastern Idaho, for example. We needed to truly understand the unique needs specific to our community members.”

    To do so, Watson worked with Coopera to organize three focus groups, each set in a different area of the ICCU field of membership. The goal was four-fold:

    1. Better understand the financial services experience of local Hispanic communities to help guide strategies for the credit union’s Hispanic growth efforts
    2. Learn how the local Hispanic communities think and feel about financial institutions
    3. Identify cultural nuances within the Hispanic community to assist in better serving these communities
    4. Provide a means of evaluating products and services for the community and how to best communicate those products and services

    Among the many learnings generated by the focus groups, Watson said several stand-outs will shape the way the cooperative’s Hispanic member experience plan is drafted. These include educational and product development opportunities, as well as guidance on how and where to market the credit union’s services. Digital banking, emphasis on family/childcare and strong attention to consistent internal training were other high-priority issues identified through the focus groups.

    Initially, Watson was skeptical about the authenticity of the results if participants knew ICCU was the host of the focus groups. However, he now believes revealing the credit union as the organizer has been beneficial.

    “Sharing that it was ICCU behind the effort allowed us to gain a deeper level of feedback about actual experiences we may not otherwise have gotten,” said Watson. “Additionally, because the participants knew it was us, there is also now an expectation that we use the data to make a difference in their experience. In fact, a couple of our participants said, ‘We’ll be watching.’”

    Watson and the ICCU management welcome this attention, as they look to prove their commitment to serving this important and growing segment of members. More focus groups and a unique plan for ongoing engagement of focus group participants are expected in the near future.

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