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  • Want to Keep Loyal Hispanic Members? It’s All About the App

    Posted by on July 5, 2017

    Hispanic consumers are significantly more likely to be mobile banking users – and significantly more likely to stay members because of it.

    pexels-photo-261628Walk down any street in your community, and it isn’t hard to find evidence that Americans are using their smartphones to manage more aspects of their lives. Their financial lives are certainly no exception, and community banking leaders are taking notice.

    According to a 2016 survey of financial institution leaders, their number one priority for 2017 was enhancing the digital and mobile experience. That’s what consumers are looking for as well. An earlier study from Bain & Company showed consumers are one-third more likely to enjoy a mobile transaction than a branch visit. What’s more, those surveyed anticipated a branch visit was 2.3 times more likely to end with annoyance.

    Mobile banking is clearly the way consumers are headed when it comes to meeting their financial needs. Yet the adoption of mobile financial services isn’t the same across all the demographic groups that make up your member base. Notably, Hispanic consumers are significantly more likely than other groups to use mobile banking technology.

    The Federal Reserve found in a 2015 study 82 percent of Hispanic consumers own a smartphone (compared to 74 percent of non-Hispanic white consumers). In addition, the study revealed Hispanic consumers with smartphones are more likely to be “high-intensity” mobile banking users – consumers who conduct mobile banking tasks more than 10 times a month.

    According to the Federal Reserve’s report, “High-intensity users include greater shares of younger and Hispanic mobile banking users, relative to all mobile banking users.” These users are transferring money between their own accounts, making bill payments through an app, receiving alerts about their accounts, locating ATMs – all the things that highly-engaged and connected credit union members do. That could easily translate to high levels of loyalty to their cooperative.

    If credit unions aren’t ready to appear in app stores now, there are plenty of other players on the financial services sector that are already there. Uulala, a fintech mobile app developed by Hispanic entrepreneurs specifically to serve unbanked Hispanic adults in the United States, is positioning itself as a way for Hispanic consumers to send money, build credit and make purchases – all without a traditional banking relationship. Uulala is launching later this year, and joins an increasingly crowded field of fintech developers looking to connect with a growing market hungry for digital banking options.

    When it comes to maintaining strong connections with your members, you know you can’t ignore their increasingly digital preferences. By creating and enhancing an app that connects with Hispanic consumers, you may find your credit union enjoying longer relationships with this increasingly influential segment.

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    Watch for the Word ‘Half’ in Hispanic Consumer Studies

    Posted by on August 25, 2016

    As the child of Mexican immigrants, I grew up in a household that was unique in many ways from those of my friends and peers. One of the differences was that my parents paid bills, saved money and accessed credit outside the traditional financial system. Hindsight being what it is, I can now see how much of an influence those financial choices had on my eventual career path.

    Although it came with challenges, my non-traditional American childhood absolutely empowered me. Today, I feel so fortunate to be living out my passion – introducing more Hispanic consumers to the life-changing benefits of becoming a credit union member.

    What’s equally exciting to me is introducing more organizations to benefits of serving Hispanic consumers. As I travel the country, talking with credit unions, colleges and other consumer-centric organizations, I’m learning so much about how perceptions continue to shape reality.

    One of the perceptions that Coopera colleagues and I are working hard to reshape is this idea the Hispanic market is homogenous. In fact, there are many nuances to the culture. Let’s take a look at a few…

    Acculturation, Language & Immigration Spectrums

    Acculturation describes how quickly an individual or set of individuals adopts the behaviors, beliefs/values and attitudes of a new culture in addition to their native culture. The spectrum goes from un-acculturated through semi-acculturated to fully acculturated.

    It’s critically important for marketers and others to understand where their target market resides on the spectrum. For instance, a credit union that believes it is best suited to serving semi- or fully acculturated Hispanics will want to know members of these two segments prefer TV and print media outlets, while radio is important for the un-acculturated. In terms of product development, credit cards are common among fully acculturated Hispanics, but that is far from true for un-acculturated individuals.

    In addition to behaviors, values and attitudes, there’s also a spectrum of language preferences that vary from Spanish to bilingual to English. Immigration status, too, changes from recent arrival to established resident to U.S. born. All of these characteristics and preferences impact the way Hispanic consumers value (or don’t value) financial services to the quality of their lives.

    Financial Attitudes and Behaviors

    There is tremendous opportunity for credit unions to foster trust and expand the financial education of some Hispanic community segments. Saving for retirement, seeking financial advice, long-term goals, personal debt and financial confidence are areas that require special concentration across segments of the Hispanic market. Here again, however, there are differences between groups within the culture.

    This is why it’s so important to view the results of national studies, surveys and indexes with a grain of salt. Take, for instance, an extensive study of more than 1,000 Hispanic individuals between 25 – 70 with incomes of $25K or higher.

    Here are just a few of the findings from that particular national study:

    –More than half indicated a poor or very poor understanding of workplace-based retirement plans.

    –Half of respondents expressed a preference for Spanish communication and materials.

    –Respondents with lower incomes and those born outside of the U.S. place higher priority on funding near-term goals such as education for their children.

    When reviewing national studies, be mindful of the word “half.” Let it serve as a reminder of the great diversity that lies within the U.S. Hispanic community. If a particular study finds half of its respondents prefer Spanish, for instance, that could mean the other half did not.

    The biggest take away: It’s critically important to understand your local market needs. Like much of the general population, Hispanic consumers strive to improve their financial situation. At the same time, acculturation, language, immigration status and other characteristics such as age, income and country of birth, have a huge influence on how that value is applied day-to-day.

    While the Hispanic population continues to grow, it will continue to change. As you approach strategic planning season, consider whether your credit union could benefit from a local market study of the influential Hispanic consumers in the communities you serve.

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